MODA Blog

Full Disclosure

Full Disclosure

The ultimate song of last summer was uncontestably “Latch”. Sam Smith’s silky smooth falsetto over swooshing synths and crisp beats had us all swooning and singing in the shower. Live, it was the perfect song to close out a two-hour show at Navy Pier from British producer duo Disclosure. The first opening act was an EDM producer/instrumentalist by the name of Pomo whose minimalist swirling synth-heavy sound meshed perfectly with the blue lights, creating a dreamy chill atmosphere. Following him was Claude VonStroke with a more thumping beat and tense drop heavy sound that filled the cavernous space.

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After a short intermission, Disclosure came on. From their mini podiums on stage decked out with DJ equipment, the brothers, Howard and Guy Lawrence, kept the crowd on its feet and dancing to a set list that included classics from their debut Settle as well as popular singles from their recent release Caracal. While there were no fancy choreographed dance routines or famous girl squad appearances, the energy was infectious as the brothers threw themselves into the equipment, in addition to contributing vocals and playing the bass guitar.

The production was more bulked up in the studio, giving songs like “When a Fire Starts to Burn” and “You & Me” an added edge and urgency. While some of the sharpness that made Settle such a standout album was lost, the general energy and rhythm of the music – full of expertly timed dips and swells, booming beats and airy transitions – made up for it. Collaborators Lion Babe and Brendan Reilley joined Disclosure on stage. Lion Babe’s strong vocals cut through the drum fog, adding extra vibrancy to her rendition of “Hourglass”. Meanwhile, Reilley, who performed “Moving Mountains” as part of the encore, truly shined as his powerful falsetto rode above the swelling music and infused the song with a greater sense of emotion and pain.

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Dressing for an urban concert like Disclosure is a wholly different affair than your typical festival/concert style. It’s simply too chilly out for fringe crop tops and cut-offs, and try wearing a flower crown and flash tats on the CTA without getting a few odd looks. The first rule of concert dressing is comfort. Don’t waste half the night worrying about your skirt riding up or if someone will spill a drink on your new shoes. Next is layers. Concert spaces, especially large ones like Navy Pier are often very chilly at first, but after a few hours of dancing to the music, it gets very warm. A sweater or a jacket that can be tied around the waist provide the perfect amount of versatility.

My outfit for the night consisted of high rise black jeans, a black crop top, well-loved high tops perfect for dancing around in (and also perfect to throw in the washing machine at the end of the night) and a black motorcycle jacket thrown on top. I ditched a purse in favor of pockets to keep things simple. Makeup-wise it’s a breezy cat eye flick and pumped up lashes (all waterproof of course, no need for sweaty raccoon eyes). It’s all easy, comfortable, and perfect for shimmying the night away.

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