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TV's Addictive Dark Horses

TV's Addictive Dark Horses

There's something deliciously easy and simple about guilty pleasures, like box mac and cheese or Lucky Charms.  Shows like The Bachelor or re-runs of 90210 are the perfect soundtrack to folding laundry or as a study break between p-sets. Dark, twisted, and addictive, TV's latest crop of shows are more whiskey on the rocks than bubbly Moscato (but oh so satisfying and binge-worthy!). 

Mr. Robot

Rami Mallek as the drug addict protagonist; image via

Rami Mallek as the drug addict protagonist; image via

Dark, paranoid, and complex, Mr. Robot is a tricky show to pin down. Part corporate drama, part conspiracy theory thriller, part computer hacking mystery, the show is full of plot twists to keep viewers on their toes. The complex plot with intertwining storylines demands your full attention (don't try and multitask while watching this one) as your increasing suspicions are often confirmed in bombshell episodes that change your fundamental understanding of the series. The lead actors are gripping in their roles, Rami Mallek's piercing eyes and subtle frantic energy convey the coiled tenseness of a paranoid, depressed drug-addict while Christian Slater plays a character much like from his role in Heathers with a manic gleefulness, like Nero playing the fiddle as Rome burned around him.

Mr. Robot airs on USA and Season 1 can be found on Amazon Prime.  

Black Mirror

Toby Kebbell in Season 1 Episode 3 "The Entire History of You"; image via

Toby Kebbell in Season 1 Episode 3 "The Entire History of You"; image via

Continuing the theme of creepy, uncomfortable tech dramas, Black Mirror is a British anthology series exploring themes of the increasing pervasiveness of technology, social isolation, anxiety through the lens of all-too-close to reality biting satire. Each episode is a standalone mini film set in alternate realities with varying degrees of similarity to our current reality. Some episodes skew more plausible than others but all have a sneaky way of getting under your skin.

All three seasons of Black Mirror can be found on Netflix.

Westworld 

James Marsden and Evan Rachel Wood; image via

James Marsden and Evan Rachel Wood; image via

"WTF just happened?!?" probably sums up best my reaction at the end of each episode of Westworld. The most accurate (if somewhat confusing) description of the show would be as a dystopian tech/sci-fi Western which sounds like a terrible combination but works brilliantly. Intellectual yet full of dramatic plot twists and gore, Westworld is a gripping show that makes you question the essence of humanity. Meaty and thought-provoking, it sinks its AI powered hooks into you and doesn't let go. 

Westworld airs on HBO.    

Featured image via

Look for Less: MODA Fashion Show 2017

Look for Less: MODA Fashion Show 2017

Sites to Shop: Bandier

Sites to Shop: Bandier